Did You Know … Week of December 15, 2018

Must Reads from Last Week The Must Reads is going into hiatus over the holiday period. The NIPR Greens wish you all a wonderful year end. Get ready for the 2019 election! Locally   Greens of North Island-Powell River December 2018 gathering Left to right: Doug Cowell, Carol Thatcher, Mark de Bruijn, Blair Cusack, Jay van Oostdam, Megan Ardyche, Mark Tapper (Photo by Pieter Vorster) About 40 Green supporters gathered at the Comox Golf Club to eat, drink and get reconnected. The next gathering will be NIPR’s candidate nomination meeting sometime in January or early February 2019. Provincially   The BC referendum on proportional representation We know that the Liberals and the anti-PR campaign are now focused on delegitimizing the outcome of the voting referendum even before the results have been announced.  Watch this video to find what they’re doing and how you can block their obvious moves against democracy in action. Municipal leaders vote in favour of a new watershed governance model In September, this blog reported on the push for this resolution at the Union of BC Municipalities upcoming meeting. “In essence, the resolution is a transfer of resources and a sharing of responsibilities (from Province to Municipal) to allow for local governments, in partnership with First Nations and local watershed entities, to have the power to address community water needs and concerns locally.” Read more. Now you can also test your River IQ. You can play this game over and over; each time you will get different rivers to choose from, and brief information about that river. Site C: Parks Canada shirks UN request for review...

Did You Know … Week of December 8, 2018

Must Reads from Last Week Locally   Cumberland council looking to ban water bottling Read more. The November 3, 2018, edition of this blog carried a similar article in which the Strathcona Regional District also took a stand against water bottling, and the July 7, 2018, edition carried various stories pertaining to water protection. Communities all over the world are fighting global corporate companies like Nestle, but also local business that want to profit from profiting from what is essentially a commons and should be a human right, since it is essential to sustain all life on Earth. As global warming increases and weather patterns change, droughts will occur in more areas and water will increasingly become a flashpoint. (For more on water, see the story of selenium pollution in the Elk Valley below.) Most Canadian cities are totally unprepared for climate change At the Union of BC Municipalities annual meeting this year, a resolution came to the floor which proposed municipalities start holding fossil fuel companies and other industries financially liable for the costs of damages and clean-up their activities result in, and which municipalities bear the brunt of the costs of. Climate change consequences and mitigation are part of that equation. Sadly, the resolution was voted down, and apparently many of the speeches against were from people who denied climate change was real. Read more. Excerpt: “[Jason] Thistlethwaite and his colleagues measured the plans against 46 indicators that include baseline information, goals, implementation, evaluation and public participation. Almost all plans failed to include an assessment of the municipality’s vulnerability to specific climate change impacts,” the paper says. Only...

Did You Know … Week of December 1, 2018

Must Reads from Last Week BC Electoral Reform Referendum   Youth reject big media disinformation on PR Referendum Throughout this referendum, “big media has been able to sow considerable confusion, but what has been the effect on the younger generation?  According to a recent poll, despite all the big media disinformation over the last year, 53 per cent of youth between the ages of 18 and 34 are likely to vote for proportional representation while only 22 per cent say they will likely vote for the existing First Past the Post (FPTP) system. Whatever the eventual outcome of the referendum, this is a stunning repudiation of big media, as well as the No side.” Read more. LOCALLY Campbell River – Drinking water protection The Campbell River Environmental Committee (CREC) started a change.org petition to BC NDP Minister George Heyman, calling on the government to “legislate enforceable and mandatory landfill siting restrictions in the Environmental Management Act.” This petition is regarding Upland Excavating Ltd’s Application to deposit Non-Hazardous solid waste and contaminated soil and treat the leachate, across from McIvor Lake, Campbell River’s drinking water. Please sign the petition and share with friends. Merville – Water protection Many of you are aware of the Merville Water Guardians and the fight to stop a request for rezoning in order to bottle and sell water from the local aquifer. The Merville Water Guardians have now started a Leadnow petition to the BC government to protect BC groundwater from commercial interests. Read and sign here. Can green innovations stop polluted stormwater from killing our waters? “…every time it rains after a dry period,...

Did You Know… Week of November 24, 2018

Must Reads from Last Week BC Electoral Reform Referendum – OMG! It’s going on longer??    The deadline for getting ballots in has been extended to 4:30 p.m., December 7, 2018, due to rotating mail strikes. Here is the link. More important news from Elections BC: There are some conditions under which a voter can request a replacement package between November 24 and November 30: if they lost or damaged the voting package they received, if they made a mistake on their ballot or certification envelope before sending it in, if their name is incorrect or misspelled on their certification envelope (e.g. former surname), or if they applied for a voting package from Elections BC before midnight on November 23 and they haven’t received it. To request a replacement package, call 1-800-661-8683 or visit a Referendum Service Office or Service BC Centre (locations are listed at elections.bc.ca/rso). Locally   Oyster River hermit priest explains decision to preserve land in will The driveway up to his home, looking back towards the main road. Photo by James Wood/98.9 The Goat/Vista Radio Excerpt: “We’re facing, right now, global warming,” said [Father] Brandt. And every tree, decreases global warming, takes out of the atmosphere certain pollutants that create global warming. So, that’s a value to everyone, to have a number of trees standing, and plants they can come and see, look at birds and animals.” Read more. Provincially   Kwispaa LNG project moves ahead The $18 billion project for the West coast of Vancouver Island submits project description to environmental assessment agencies. Read more. Navigable Waters Parliamentary petition E-1601 Nathan Cullen sponsored this petition...

Did You Know … Week of November 17, 2018

Must Reads from Last Week BC Electoral Reform Referendum Quote pick of the day, from York University professor, Dennis Pilon: “There’s lots of arguments in favour of our current system - it’s just they’re not democratic ones. They’re great for dictatorships.” Fair Vote Comox Valley and Fair Vote Campbell River are both out talking to voters at events this weekend. Elections BC reported, as of Friday, that 18% of ballots have been returned. Please ask all your friends and family in BC to send in their ballots. Or better yet, drop them off at their local Service BC centre, due to the rotating mail strikes. Provincially   The growing pains of BC water law An excellent article by Gavin MacRae of the Watershed Sentinel, special to Decafnation. Excerpt: “BC’s original Water Act was a relic, drafted when Vancouver was still a fledgling city and before Canada’s first airplane took to the skies. It would govern water use in the province for over a century, until in 2016, a long overdue replacement arrived: the Water Sustainability Act (WSA). Conceived after a long period of public consultation, the WSA aims to “address the new challenges of the 21st century, including climate change, population growth and increasing pressure on water resources.” … and so, the POLIS Water Sustainability Project is very important “Anybody, I would challenge them, name me something you think is important, whether you think it’s the economy, or local livability (sic), or food systems, or good health — all of it ties back to water. So as a society we better get our water management and water governance right....

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